For press inquiries, please contact Nick Bradley: You can contact Nick via e-mail: Nick@KheYo.com


Conde Nast

Conde Nast

Conde Nast Traveler — November 2015

When acclaimed New york chef Phet Schwader decided to take his mother to Laos, he thought they'd eat their way through the country they once called home. What he didn't expect? A chance discovery that would change their lives forever.

Lobster Dishes With Mass Appeal

Lobster Dishes With Mass Appeal

The Wall Street Journal — August 2014

SUMMERTIME, AT ITS very best, announces itself in little rituals: the sprint down the beach to feel the ocean hit your toes, the beer yanked from an ice-filled cooler. Up and down the New England coast, the first lobster of the season emerges steaming from an aluminum pot and is served with a little cup of drawn butter, a plastic bib and a fistful of moist towelettes.

Bring On The Funk

Bring On The Funk

The Epoch Times — July 2014

The Swedes have their surstromming---fermented herring. The English created Worcestershire sauce---with fermented anchovies going into Lea & Perrins's formulas as far back as 1835. And as old as antiquity itself, the Romans enjoyed garum, a fermented fish sauce made from fish macerated in salt and cured in the sun.

Tables For Two: Khe-Yo

Tables For Two: Khe-Yo

The New Yorker — January 2014

You can get an animal’s face on a salad just about anywhere these days—even in midtown, at Xi’an Famous Foods, where bits of lamb tongue, nose, and cheek are jumbled up with chili-coated cucumber in a gloriously oily mess. (Perhaps soon we’ll see a whole head at Chop’t: “Cartilage & Crunch.”) And yet it’s still a little bit thrilling to hear that the special at Khe-Yo, a new Laotian restaurant situated amid the baby gyms and branded nail salons of Tribeca, is a pig’s-face salad. Even more so is the fact that the dish turns out to be rich, springy, and bright.

Khe-Yo’s Free Rice, Fiery Duck Banh Mi Sizzle: Review

Khe-Yo’s Free Rice, Fiery Duck Banh Mi Sizzle: Review

Bloomberg Businessweek — November 2013

Certain New York restaurants will charge you four bucks for steak sauce; at others, bread might set you back five. Then there’s Khe-Yo, a Laotian-inspired hotspot where the best dish -- sticky rice -- is free. You scoop it up and loosen the mound with your fingers. The warm grains, served in a straw basket, are semi-dry and gently glutinous, with just enough tanginess to make your mouth water.

The Crunchy Lure of Southeast Asia

The Crunchy Lure of Southeast Asia

Pete Wells/The New York Times — October 2013

Khe-Yo, opened in July by the chef Marc Forgione and Soulayphet Schwader, one of his longtime cooks, works the other way around. It’s easy to navigate the menu, with appetizers and main courses heavy on animal protein serving as recognizable landmarks. But while much of the food is very appealing, not all of it makes you feel as if you’ve left home.

Off With a Bang Bang

Off With a Bang Bang

Gael Greene/Manhattan Luxury Magazine — October 2013

Friends always ask, “What do you love lately? Where do you really want to go?” Eating out, as I do, six evenings a week, I often need a break from endlessly stalking the new. I went to the wildly noisy Quality Italian steakhouse when they were still finishing the decor and was back the next week. Never mind the raucous crowd, I couldn’t wait.

Khe-Yo's Soulayphet

Khe-Yo's Soulayphet

Village Voice — October 2013

Soulayphet "Phet" Schwader may have grown up in the midwest--Wichita, Kansas, to be precise--but his upbringing centered on preserving traditions from Laos, his homeland. A Laotian community thrived in Wichita, he explains, and so in addition to traveling around the country with his Laotian soccer team and becoming involved with the Laotian Buddhist temple, he ate feasts prepared by his mother, who shopped at Laotian grocery stores for ingredients prevalent in Asia.

Laotian Food Hits Tribeca

Laotian Food Hits Tribeca

The New York Post — September 2013

Grilled quail at new Khe-Yo made my friend quail: “It’s like a man burned at the stake,” she said. The little creature did look gruesome, impaled on a stick and seared near-black. But ginger suffused the richly caramelized flesh. Bang-bang sauce, a nuclear-strength elixir of Thai chilies and garlic, mortar-and-pestled into a gorgeous lime-juice mosaic, set the bird on fire.

The 10 Most Exciting Emerging Cuisines Nationwide

ZAGAT — September 2013

Soulayphet "Phet" Schwader may have grown up in the midwest--Wichita, Kansas, to be precise--but his upbringing centered on preserving traditions from Laos, his homeland. A Laotian community thrived in Wichita, he explains, and so in addition to traveling around the country with his Laotian soccer team and becoming involved with the Laotian Buddhist temple, he ate feasts prepared by his mother, who shopped at Laotian grocery stores for ingredients prevalent in Asia.